Health and wellbeing tips for 2017

Although New Years resolutions are often broken, there are several things you can decide to do that really will improve your mental and physical health not only for one year, but years to come too.

Research states that we are more likely to achieve our resolutions if we break them down into small, measurable, time based goals. With this in mind it could be worth writing down your resolutions in order of priority and seeing how you could split them down into bite size tasks. For example, if you wish to do more exercise or lose weight then maybe joining the gym could be your first step.

Healthy Eating

Eating more healthily has become highly documented after research has emerged showing the various detrimental effects of eating foods high in fat. This doesn’t have to be expensive or complicated. The basic principles are to ensure you eat lots of fruit and vegetables (recommended five per day), aim at one third of your diet being made up of starchy foods (potatoes, cereal, pasta, rice and bread). Where possible with these starchy foods choose wholegrain versions as they are packed with fibre and keep you fuller for longer resulting in less naughty snacking. Including more fish that is a great source of protein, vitamins and minerals will also do your body good. Oily fish are especially healthy as they contain omega 3 fats which can help to prevent heart disease.

Exercise More

Something that sounds obvious but is difficult to implement when we all lead such busy lives, is exercise. It is proven that adequate amounts of exercise (recommended 150 minutes per week) can reduce the risk of major illnesses such as heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and cancer by up to a huge 50%. Not only that, scientists have found that physical activity can boost self-esteem, mood, sleep quality, energy and reduce the risk of stress, depression, dementia and Alzheimer’s.

Reduce Alcohol

Reducing the amount of alcohol you consume means the foggy feeling in your brain will clear enabling you to concentrate more deeply than when you drink heavily and regularly. Your liver will also start to repair itself and you will see an improvement in your general health and complexion. By saving money, by not buying as much alcohol, it will enable you to join the gym or visit exercise classes or even shop more healthily. For some, alcohol is a coping strategy which can make it even more difficult to cut down.

If you need help with a drinking problem don’t hesitate to visit: www.alcoholics-anonymous.org.uk